Monthly Archives: February 2021

Redistricting Process Must Be Transparent

The Census release statewide data on April 26, but more detailed population data for drawing new maps for legislative districts won’t be released until late August. As legislative redistricting proceeds, League members across the state are actively working for fair maps and a transparent redistricting process, including submitting testimony at hearings by the House Special Committee on Redistricting. Click here for Fair Maps Matter, a guest column by Evelyn Maddox.

A Fair Redistricting committee headed by Sharon Schneeberger of Columbia hopes Missouri will follow the PACT guidelines proposed by Dr. Sheldon H. Jacobson of the University of Illinois.

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P: People over politics in carrying out the redistricting process.
A: Accountability of those involved in making the maps.
C: Compromise in making decisions about the goals.
T: Transparency in each step of the process.

Amendment 3 overturned the redistricting reforms voters approved in 2018 and could allow twice the level of partisan gerrymandering typically described as “severe,” but it doesn’t have to. The League is especially concerned about language calling for “one person one vote” since it could make Missouri the only state not using the total population count when drawing legislative districts. That would leave out 1.5 million Missouri children.

Click here for LWVMO’s Fair Maps resource page.

Supporting Election Reforms

The League is calling on U.S. Senators to act on democracy reforms recently approved in the U.S. House. LWVUS has called for national advocacy on the For the People Act, HR 1 in the House and S1 in the Senate. Click here for a fact sheet.

This pro-voter legislation ensures free, fair and accessible elections. This comprehensive bill would transform our political system into one that is more inclusive, responsive, and representative of the American people. Its reforms would:

  • Expand and protect voting rights and access to the ballot;
  • Put ordinary Americans ahead of Big Money donors;
  • End gerrymandering so that electoral districts are fairly drawn; and
  • Clean up government and hold elected officials to the highest ethical standards.

The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act (HR 4) will be introduced again this summer to restore parts of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that the Supreme Court eliminated in Shelby County vs. Holder (2013). States would again have to receive preapproval from the Department of Justice or the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia before making legal changes to their voting practices.